Crimes of Grindelwald Review

Alyssa Fredette '20, Staff Writer

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*Warning: Contains spoilers for previous Fantastic Beast movie*

 

It’s time to dive back into the Wizarding World. Fantastic Beasts: Crimes of Grindelwald picks back up six months after Grindelwald was captured in New York. Newt Scamander is back in England, where he has been forbidden from international travel. A young Albus Dumbledore makes an appearance!

Another important character, Newt’s brother, Theseus, makes an appearance. The sibling dynamic between the two of them really is amazing. Add in Leta Lestrange, Newt’s former best friend who now works at the ministry, and you learn a lot about Newt’s childhood.

Most of the film takes place in Paris, which is yet another facet of the Wizarding World seldom featured in the books. It has its own ministry and magical streets, and, of course, magical creatures.

There are a few other characters and various references to things from the Harry Potter series. If you happen to see the movie in a packed theater, likely you will hear some cheering when Hogwarts appears.

The movie follows a few different viewpoints, with a lot of the focus being on Grindelwald as well as Newt. It explores new dynamics to the relationships between Newt and Tina as well as Queenie and Jacob. Dumbledore, of course, gets to impart some great wisdom. If you’ve read the books, then you will be aware that Dumbledore and Grindelwald were once friends, and this movie does not ignore that fact. Relationships, and not just romantic ones, but platonic and sibling ones as well, are very key to this film, and it’s done very well (of course, because J.K. Rowling wrote the script).

If you’ve read the Harry Potter series a few too many times, you may notice some inconsistencies, but otherwise it’s a great film, although, as it is part of a series, the ending leaves something to be desired. The next Fantastic Beast movie will come out in November 2020.

 

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