2020 Presidential Candidates

Nyiah Lance ‘22, Staff Writer

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This year’s election season has been one for the books. It has been the largest amount of presidential candidates and more female candidates than ever. On Tuesday, November 3, 2020, the presidential election will be underway. To give you a closer look, here are all of the candidates for the future presidential position and one thing they say they’d like to contribute to the United States. 

 

Democrats: 

 

Michael Bennet, Senator (CO). Bennet wants to stimulate the economy and lower the costs of a middle class life. 

 

Joseph R. Biden Jr., former vice president (Barack Obama) and senator (DE). Biden wants to strengthen America’s “economic protections for low-income workers in industries like manufacturing and fast food” (Burns, Flegenheimer, Lee, Lerer and Martin). 

 

Cory Booker, Senator (NJ) and former mayor of Newark. Booker wants the government to have a savings program called “Baby Bonds” that would provide a fund for low income children to use later in their lives for housing and education. 

 

Steve Bullock, governor (MT) and former state attorney general. Bullock wants to lower the economic inequalities in early childhood and other aspects of the economy. 

 

Pete Buttigieg, mayor of South Bend, Indiana. Buttigieg stresses issues like climate change. 

 

Julián Castro, former housing secretary and mayor of San Antonio. Castro focuses on topics of education for everyone and immigration. 

 

John Delaney, former congressman (MD) and businessman. Delaney is a bipartisan candidate that wants to stress universal health care. 

 

Tulsi Gabbard, congresswoman (HI). Gabbard wants to end unnecessary U.S. military intervention in foreign countries. 

 

Kamala Harris, senator (CA), former attorney general (CA), and former state attorney (San Francisco). Harris wants to pose middle-class tax cut legislation. 

 

Amy Klobuchar, senator (MN). Klobuchar focuses on the opioid epidemic and the cost of prescription drugs. 

 

Wayne Messam, mayor of Miramar (FL). Messam would like to cancel student debts for 44 million Americans. 

 

Beto O’Rourke, former congressman (TX). O’Rourke wants to legalize marijuana and work on reforming immigration policies. 

 

Tim Ryan, congressman (OH) and former congressional staff. Ryan emphasizes enforcing trade deals and developing diplomatic relationships with other countries.

 

Bernie Sanders, senator (VT) and former congressman. Sanders advocates for “Medicare for All”, reducing the influence of  “the billionaires”, and free college tuition.

 

Joe Sestak, former congressman (PA). Sestak wants to resist climate change. 

 

Tom Steyer, impeachment and climate change activist. Steyer wants to fight climate change and impeach Donald Trump. 

 

Elizabeth Warren, senator (MA) and former professor from Harvard. Warren wants to rebuild the middle class and end corruption in Washington. 

 

Marianne Williamson, new-age lecturer. Williamson wants to give $100 billion to the black community in slavery reparations.

 

Andrew Yang, founder of an economic development nonprofit. Yang wants to provide a $1,000 monthly universal basic income to all Americans. 

 

Republicans: 

 

Mark Sanford, former congressman (SC) and former governor of the state. Sanford wants to spark a national debate about America’s terrible debt.

 

Donald Trump, current president. Trump wants to enforce immigration restrictions and build a wall between the United States and Mexico. 

 

Joe Walsh, former congressman (IL). Walsh wants to reduce national debt, secure the borders, and defeat Donald Trump. 

 

William F. Weld, former governor (MA) and former federal prosecutor. Weld wants to, along with other things, reform American immigration policy. 

 

Among the 23 candidates, there are 7 that have dropped out of the race, 3 who are unlikely to run, and 14 not running, including Stacey Abrams, Micheal Bloomberg, Hilary Clinton, and Oprah Winfrey. Good luck to all candidates, and for students who will be 18 or older by next November, make sure you vote in the upcoming election for our next United States president. 

 

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