Interview with the Drowsy Chaperone

Maura Ward '17, Staff Writer

    Tagline: I made a joke at the newspaper meeting that turned into something bigger than me.  Almost twice the size of me.

     Whisked back in time (it doesn’t matter how), I had a few hours to spend with Ms. Beatrice Stockwell, herself.  Just kidding!  I talked to…myself about what it was like to be in Masque’s fall production of The Drowsy Chaperone.

 

Me: So, I’ve known you for quite some time.

 

Me (but wearing a slightly different hat): Yes, you have.

 

Me: And I was aware that you were a part of the Masque.  But I’m sort of confused as to what went on there this fall.

 

Me (but wearing a slightly different hat): Well, the fall show was The Drowsy Chaperone, which is basically the story of a man sitting in a chair telling the story of mistaken identities, gangster pastry chefs, and an eight-person wedding.  

 

Me: Sounds really weird, but I did see it, and I can confirm that I enjoyed it.  What part did you play?

 

Me (but wearing a slightly different hat): I was the Drowsy Chaperone.

 

Me: Alright. So, according to my research, you had to act drunk for the whole time.

 

Me (but wearing a slightly different hat):  Yeah.  I still don’t know if I did a good job with that, but I had a lot of fun!  

 

Me: What are things like behind the scenes?

 

Me (but wearing a slightly different hat): Tech week, the week of the show, is stressful for cast members and members of stage crew because everything has to come together extremely quickly.  The cast must know what they are doing because the focus is on perfecting the tempo of songs and the timing for lighting and set changes.  I find it really scary that if you freeze onstage the show grinds to a halt.  

 

Me: I am almost paralyzed with fear just thinking about it.  Good thing you’re the one onstage.  So, what was your favorite part of the experience?

 

Me (but wearing a slightly different hat): Can I say two?

 

Me: I’ll allow it.

 

Me (but wearing a slightly different hat): Well, by tech week, everyone has the songs memorized, so when people  aren’t on stage, most of them are furiously lip-syncing or attempting the dances that they aren’t in.  It’s fun.  That was my first one.

 

Me: Noted.

 

Me (but wearing a slightly different hat): My other favorite moment, and I guess this also applies to every show, is after the curtain closes.  When the stage is completely dark, everyone gives everyone else a hug.  For this show, my friend Sara stood behind me at curtain call, so she picked me up and spun me around after the curtain closed.  

 

Me: Masque sounds great.  Can I join?

 

Me (but wearing a slightly different hat): Silly me!  You’re already in Masque.  But if anyone wants to join, just know that it’s a lot of work.  The first couple of rehearsals can get a little tedious, but, by tech week, because of the long hours, everyone is really close.  

 

Me: So, people should audition for the spring show, even if they’re scared of auditions or afraid they won’t have fun or feel welcome at Masque.  

 

Me (but wearing a slightly different hat): Yes!  Definitely!

 

Me: And what about stage crew?

 

Me (but wearing a slightly different hat): Look, I’m in the cast.  I don’t know what goes on at stage crew.  They have a twitter, though.  Ask Caroline Albacete for an interview if you want stage crew details.  

 

Me: Fine, I WILL.  It was great talking to you and definitely not weird.

 

And they parted ways, never to be in the same room together ever again.